Sports Medicine News


Sports Medicine News


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Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today
Sports medicine bridges the gap between science and practice in the promotion of exercise and health, and in the scientific assessment, study and understanding of sports performance. Sports medicine covers subjects such as sports injury prevention and treatment, exercise for health, drugs in sport, recommendations for training and nutrition and maximizing peak performance and exercise physiology.

Moving every 30 minutes may help you live longer
Prolonged sitting may raise the risk of early death, but new research suggests that this risk could be offset by getting up and moving every half an hour.
Ten common knee injuries and treatment
The knee is one of the body's more complicated joints and is susceptible to various injuries. Here are ten of the most common knee injuries.
Ledderhose disease: Treatments, diet, and surgery
What is ledderhose disease? What are the symptoms, what are the causes, does diet play a role in the condition and how is it diagnosed?
Exercise may alter men's food choices, but not women's
How does exercise influence diet? According to the results of a new study, the answer may depend on whether you are a man or a woman.
How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all.
Boxer's fracture: Treatment, diagnosis, and recovery
A boxer's fracture is a bone fracture that affects knuckles in the hand. In this article, learn about the causes, how it is diagnosed, and treatments.
Dog walkers motivated by happiness, not health
It appears to be a case of 'do what makes you happy' for people who regularly walk their dogs.
How to lose subcutaneous fat: All you need to know
What is subcutaneous fat? In this article, we look at the health impact of subcutaneous fat, what causes it, and how to lose it through exercises and diet.
What is a spiral fracture? Causes and treatment
A spiral fracture is a type of bone fracture. It occurs when a long bone is twisted with force. Learn about the potential symptoms, and how it is treated.
Prolonged sitting and TV watching 'dangerous' for seniors
Insufficient physical activity, combined with excessive TV watching and sedentary behavior, dramatically raises the risk of walking disability in seniors.
Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth
The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska...
Dancing may help to combat brain aging
Researchers have found that both strength-endurance training and dancing increased hippocampal volume in the brain, but the latter had the greatest impact.
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concuss...
University athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
Exercise right after learning improves memory in women
New research suggests that as little as 5 minutes of light exercise immediately after a learning session improves memory in women.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise?
Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look at the how long it will take.

Sports Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine. Read the latest research on competitive and recreational sports, including information on the occurrence and treatment of sports injuries.

Sensors could identify biomarkers, improve early-stage detection, treatment o...
Researchers have found a method of identifying biological markers in small amounts of blood that they believe could be used to detect a myriad of diseases, infections and different medical conditions at early stages. The researchers have created microelectromechanical resonators, or small vibrating sensors, that can detect these biomarkers using just a drop or two of blood.
Male triathletes may be putting their heart health at risk
Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis, according to new research. The increased risk, which was not evident in female triathletes, was directly associated with the athletes' amount of exercise.
Molecules in spit may be able to diagnose, predict length of concussions
Diagnosing a concussion can sometimes be a guessing game, but clues taken from small molecules in saliva may be able to help diagnose and predict the duration of concussions in children, according to researchers.
Achilles is more than just one tendon
The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the human body. It can bear loads exceeding over 900 kilograms during running. Despite its strength, it is prone to injuries and it is not yet well known what factors predict good or bad recovery from injuries.
Screening programs unlikely to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive a...
Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests.
Injury from contact sport has harmful, though temporary effect on memory
Neuroscientists studying sports-related head injuries have found that it takes less than a full concussion to cause memory loss, possibly because even mild trauma can interrupt the production of new neurons in a region of the brain responsible for memory.
Adolescents use dietary supplements to increase sports performance and improv...
Adolescents in developed countries frequently use dietary supplements despite a lack of knowledge about possible harmful effects or drug interactions. Often males turn to dietary supplements in an attempt to increase their performance for sports while females are more concerned with preventing illness and disease. To understand the underlying reasons and sources of recommendation for dietary supplement use among adolescents, researchers studied both athletes and nonathletes.
Firearm Injuries Becoming More Severe
New research has revealed that the severity of firearm injuries has increased over the past 20 years.
Anabolic androgenic steroids may be associated with early coronary artery dis...
Anabolic androgenic steroids may be associated with early coronary artery disease, according to new research.
Obesity increases incidence, severity, costs of knee dislocations
The obesity epidemic is resulting in a higher risk of knee dislocations as well as serious vascular injuries and higher treatment costs, a new national study finds.
Retired professional footballers at higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Retired professional footballers are far more prone to develop knee pain and osteoarthritis and face problems with their knees earlier in life than the average person, a study has revealed.
Why do some head knocks cause more damage than others?
Veteran sailors know that rogue waves can rise suddenly in mid-ocean to capsize even the largest vessels. Now it appears that a similar phenomenon called shear shock wave occurs in the concussed brain. It may help explain why some head knocks cause so much more harm than others.
New biomarkers can detect concussions, even mild ones, through simple blood test
Proteins from brain cells called astrocytes can be detected in blood immediately after head injury, suggesting that a blood test may be used to detect concussions, even mild ones.
Football position and length of play affect brain impact
Damage to white matter in the brains of former college and professional football players due to recurrent head impacts can be related to playing position and career duration, according to a new study.
Competitive divers face high risk of back, shoulder and other injuries
Competitive divers face a high risk of injuring their shoulders, back, elbows, wrists and other body parts, according to sports medicine physicians.